Long-term trauma outcomes heavily impacted by gender and education level

Long-term trauma outcomes heavily impacted by gender and education level
Center for Surgery and Public Health

Medical Xpress January 4, 2019

Trauma is a leading cause of disability in the world, resulting in more disability-adjusted life years than any other disease. While in-hospital, trauma-related mortality has decreased to just 4 percent in the U.S., little is known about what happens to the 96 percent of patients who survive their trauma injuries but may suffer debilitating long-term effects. Through the Functional Outcomes and Recovery after Trauma Emergencies (FORTE) project, Brigham and Women’s Hospital researchers followed 1,736 trauma patients over 30 months to determine the long-term functional, physical, and mental health consequences of trauma and the factors associated with them. The FORTE project’s findings show that long-term sequelae of trauma exceed previous expectations and identified that patient sociodemographic factors such as female gender and low education were associated with worse recovery. This suggests that social support systems are an essential component of recovery. The findings appeared in Annals of Surgery.

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